Hagen Peterson
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6-7th C. Anglo-Saxons - Wulfheodenas History Society - http://www.wulfheodenas.com/

6-7th C. Anglo-Saxons - Wulfheodenas History Society - http://www.wulfheodenas.com/

Anglo-Saxon god of war Tiw with a wolf like creature on either side. This image of Tiw was found on ornately crafted jewelry from the Sutton Hoo burial. He is possibly the oldest of all the gods worshipped by the early English. Tiw lost his right hand through an act of bravery and thus his symbol was said to evoke honour and courage. Protector of warriors, and is said to watch over the disabled. His runic symbol was stamped onto swords and other weapons for strength,

Anglo-Saxon god of war Tiw with a wolf like creature on either side. This image of Tiw was found on ornately crafted jewelry from the Sutton Hoo burial. He is possibly the oldest of all the gods worshipped by the early English. Tiw lost his right hand through an act of bravery and thus his symbol was said to evoke honour and courage. Protector of warriors, and is said to watch over the disabled. His runic symbol was stamped onto swords and other weapons for strength,

Anglo-Saxon God Tiw with wolves -- edited (simplified) version of the original Anglo-Saxon jewelery design which was found at the Sutton Hoo burial site. The original design was found on a purse lid and features the Anglo-Saxon god of war, Tiw. On either side of Tiw, stand two animals which have been identified as wolves.

Anglo-Saxon God Tiw with wolves -- edited (simplified) version of the original Anglo-Saxon jewelery design which was found at the Sutton Hoo burial site. The original design was found on a purse lid and features the Anglo-Saxon god of war, Tiw. On either side of Tiw, stand two animals which have been identified as wolves.

Symbol for the Anglo-Saxon concept of Wyrd ("Fate"). Wyrd was the belief that no one knew when they were going to die, but once they did, they would be judged. The result of that judgement would decide whether or not they went to Valhalla.

Symbol for the Anglo-Saxon concept of Wyrd ("Fate"). Wyrd was the belief that no one knew when they were going to die, but once they did, they would be judged. The result of that judgement would decide whether or not they went to Valhalla.