Egbert Arnold Eiselt

Egbert Arnold Eiselt

Egbert Arnold Eiselt
Weitere Ideen von Egbert Arnold
VOYAGER 1 - 20 aout 1977 -jupiter saturne héliopause milieu interstellaire - NASA

VOYAGER 1 - 20 aout 1977 -jupiter saturne héliopause milieu interstellaire - NASA

An image from the surface of Titan (Saturn Moon with lakes/oceans) — the only image from the surface of an object farther away than Mars.

An image from the surface of Titan (Saturn Moon with lakes/oceans) — the only image from the surface of an object farther away than Mars.

Valles Marineris: The Grand Canyon of Mars ~ The largest canyon in the Solar System cuts a wide swath across the face of Mars, extends over 3,000 kilometers long, spans as much as 600 kilometers across, and delves as much as 8 kilometers deep. By comparison, the Earth's Grand Canyon in Arizona, USA is 800 kilometers long, 30 kilometers across, and 1.8 kilometers deep. This image taken by Viking Orbiter.

Valles Marineris: The Grand Canyon of Mars ~ The largest canyon in the Solar System cuts a wide swath across the face of Mars, extends over 3,000 kilometers long, spans as much as 600 kilometers across, and delves as much as 8 kilometers deep. By comparison, the Earth's Grand Canyon in Arizona, USA is 800 kilometers long, 30 kilometers across, and 1.8 kilometers deep. This image taken by Viking Orbiter.

A methane drop was pictured condensed on the surface of Huygens probe after it landed on Titan in 2005. Like Earth, Titan has clouds, lakes and river channels, and it may be the only other place in the solar system where liquid evaporates from the surface and returns as rain. "Aside from Earth, it’s the most exciting world there is," says lead author Erich Karkoschka of the University of Arizona in Tucson.

A methane drop was pictured condensed on the surface of Huygens probe after it landed on Titan in 2005. Like Earth, Titan has clouds, lakes and river channels, and it may be the only other place in the solar system where liquid evaporates from the surface and returns as rain. "Aside from Earth, it’s the most exciting world there is," says lead author Erich Karkoschka of the University of Arizona in Tucson.