Mbembe Akparabong (Nigeria)

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In the Roman pantheon, Janus is the two-faced god of beginnings, limits, doors, gateways, and departure.  Unlike the other Greco-Roman deities, Janus was not imported from Greece to Rome.

Janus, God of the Threshold

In the Roman pantheon, Janus is the two-faced god of beginnings, limits, doors, gateways, and departure. Unlike the other Greco-Roman deities, Janus was not imported from Greece to Rome.

It's January first today, New Year's Day.   Happy New Year!   Here we are at the turning point in the year, at the threshold or gateway ...

It's January first today, New Year's Day. Happy New Year! Here we are at the turning point in the year, at the threshold or gateway ...

In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Janus is the god of beginnings and transitions, thence also of gates, doors, doorways, endings and time. He is usually a two-faced god since he looks to the future and the past. The Romans dedicated the month of January to Janus.

In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Janus is the god of beginnings and transitions, thence also of gates, doors, doorways, endings and time. He is usually a two-faced god since he looks to the future and the past. The Romans dedicated the month of January to Janus.

Anne of Bretony as Prudence (the Virtue). Her face is used for the woman's face and the ancient face signifies wisdom (and prudence).

Anne of Bretony as Prudence (the Virtue). Her face is used for the woman's face and the ancient face signifies wisdom (and prudence).

Janus-for whom January was named. (Some say Juno, but I think June claims that honor)

Janus-for whom January was named. (Some say Juno, but I think June claims that honor)

Oliver Laric's "Sun Tzu Janus," 2012, Polyurethane and pigments  Tanya Leighton Gallery

Oliver Laric's "Sun Tzu Janus," 2012, Polyurethane and pigments Tanya Leighton Gallery

German rosary, ivory and silver with partially gilded mounts, ca.1500–1525

German rosary, ivory and silver with partially gilded mounts, ca.1500–1525

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