Aramaic alphabet

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

ARAMAIC  The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

ARAMAIC The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

Development of the Early Aramaic Alphabet | Imperial Aramaic… | Flickr

Development of the Early Aramaic Alphabet | Imperial Aramaic… | Flickr

ancient alphabet comparison | Hebrew Alphabet Chart–Hebraeische Alphabets Tabelle

Hebrew Alphabet Chart–Hebraeische Alphabets Tabelle

The Syriac Aramaic Alphabet. First noted was the Estrangelo script (called Estrangela in the Chaldean Churches) in the manuscripts of St. Ephrem of Edessa, Syria. Geographic differentiation produced a second script of Western Syriac called Serto, a simplified writing form of Estrangelo for the Antiochene Churches, and a third script of Eastern Syriac known as Madnhaya for the Chaldean Churches. A fourth Syriac script known as Karshuni (or Garshuni) was later employed for copying Arabic…

The Syriac Aramaic Alphabet. First noted was the Estrangelo script (called Estrangela in the Chaldean Churches) in the manuscripts of St. Ephrem of Edessa, Syria. Geographic differentiation produced a second script of Western Syriac called Serto, a simplified writing form of Estrangelo for the Antiochene Churches, and a third script of Eastern Syriac known as Madnhaya for the Chaldean Churches. A fourth Syriac script known as Karshuni (or Garshuni) was later employed for copying Arabic…

Aramaic inscriptions possibly dating from the 6th century BCE have been recovered from Tayma. It is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The biblical eponym is apparently Tema, one of the sons of Ishmael.  According to Arab tradition, Tayma was inhabited by a Jewish community during the late classical period, though whether these were exiled Judeans or the Arab descendants of converts is unclear.

Aramaic inscriptions possibly dating from the 6th century BCE have been recovered from Tayma. It is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The biblical eponym is apparently Tema, one of the sons of Ishmael. According to Arab tradition, Tayma was inhabited by a Jewish community during the late classical period, though whether these were exiled Judeans or the Arab descendants of converts is unclear.

Aramaic alphabet - Wikipedia Bilingual Greek and Aramaic inscription by the Mauryan emperor Ashoka the Great at Kandahar, Afghanistan, 3rd century BC.

Aramaic alphabet - Wikipedia Bilingual Greek and Aramaic inscription by the Mauryan emperor Ashoka the Great at Kandahar, Afghanistan, 3rd century BC.

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