Interesting way to remember the Circle of Willis https://ellievsmedicalschool.wordpress.com/2015/01/04/in-which-ellie-gets-desperate-with-her-mnemonic-devices/

Interesting way to remember the Circle of Willis https://ellievsmedicalschool.wordpress.com/2015/01/04/in-which-ellie-gets-desperate-with-her-mnemonic-devices/

The Circle of Willis is an arterial polygon formed as the internal carotid and vertebral systems anastomose around the optic chiasm and infundibulum of the pituitary stalk in the suprasellar cistern. This communicating pathway allows equalization of blood-flow between the two sides of the brain, and permits anastomotic circulation, should a part of the circulation be occluded. https://radiopaedia.org/articles/circle-of-willis

The Circle of Willis is an arterial polygon formed as the internal carotid and vertebral systems anastomose around the optic chiasm and infundibulum of the pituitary stalk in the suprasellar cistern. This communicating pathway allows equalization of blood-flow between the two sides of the brain, and permits anastomotic circulation, should a part of the circulation be occluded. https://radiopaedia.org/articles/circle-of-willis

El Polígono o Círculo de Willis ¿cómo no se me ocurrió?. Welcome to Circle of Willis.

El Polígono o Círculo de Willis ¿cómo no se me ocurrió?. Welcome to Circle of Willis.

The circle of Willis, also known as circulus arteriosus cerebri, located at the base of the brain is composed of the PCA, posterior communicating artery, MCA, ACA, and the anterior communicating artery. The circle is made up of a group of interconnected arteries and gets it's name from Thomas Willis (1621-1675). Willis wrote Cerebri Anatome, one of his most famous books, in 1664. This was where he described the circle of arteries and received his eponym.

The circle of Willis, also known as circulus arteriosus cerebri, located at the base of the brain is composed of the PCA, posterior communicating artery, MCA, ACA, and the anterior communicating artery. The circle is made up of a group of interconnected arteries and gets it's name from Thomas Willis (1621-1675). Willis wrote Cerebri Anatome, one of his most famous books, in 1664. This was where he described the circle of arteries and received his eponym.

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