#Carboniferous #Earth Time of Great Coal Swamps. By the Late Carboniferous the continents that make up modern North America and Europe had collided with the southern continents of Gondwana to form  the western half of Pangea.  Ice covered much of the southern hemisphere and vast coal swamps formed along the equator.

Time of Great Coal Swamps. By the Late Carboniferous the…

Late Permian 255.jpg (119462 bytes)

Greatest Extinction of All Time. Vast deserts covered western Pangea during the Permian as reptiles spread across the face of the supercontinent. of all life perished during the extinction event that marked the end of the Paleozoic Era.

Map of the Day: Pangea, With Modern-Day Borders

Map of the Day: Pangea, With Modern-Day Borders

Pangea Redrawn With Today's Political Boundaries. Once, the earth was comprised of a supercontinent called Pangea. So what would that continent look like if it had the political boundaries of today?

Middle Miocene 014.jpg (125052 bytes)

Earth in the Miocene - apart from higher sea levels, warmer temperatures, and slightly different critters, not too different from today's Earth.

Version 2.0 for iPhone and iPad is now available. The pangaea app by Tasa Graphic Arts dynamically shows the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea and the positions of the continents over the last 200 million years. Illustrated by Dennis Tasa. Earth science geology app available for the iPod and iPhone.

The pangaea app by Tasa Graphic Arts dynamically shows the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea & the positions of the continents over the last 200 Ma. Illustrated by Dennis Tasa. Earth science geology app available for the iPod and iPhone

Triassic: geologic period from 250-200 May; first period of Mesozoic Era; between Permian and Jurassic Periods; both start and end marked by major extinction events

Triassic: geologic period from May; first period of Mesozoic Era; between Permian and Jurassic Periods; both start and end marked by major extinction events

Pangaea, The theory of Pangea is that millions of years ago all the continents were joined together in one enormous land mass known as Pangea. Then for a reason that is still not known for sure, the continents broke apart and began to drift in opposite directions. The theory goes on to say that the continents will continue to drift until they meet again, in a different configuration.

Yes, An Amazing Contemporary Geopolitical Map of Pangea. And look where did you live on this Pangea map with contemporary geopolitical boraders.

North American tectonics during the Early Cretaceous (125 Ma) Two large arms of the rising sea are about to converge, held up temporarily by tectonic barriers such as the Trans-Continental Arch and the Ouachita Uplift. Ocean basins, inherently deeper, are designated as dark blue: whereas, shallow epicontinental (epeiric) basins and continental shelves are light blue. Adapted from Ron Blakey and Colorado Plateau Geosystems Inc.

North American tectonics during the Early Cretaceous Ma) Two large arms of…

Last Glacial Maximum

The earth was a pretty cold place years ago at the Last Glacial Maximum. Some geologist think we may be on the verge of plummeting into another one, myself included.

Pleistocene pluvial lakes of the Basin n Range and adjacent areas of California, Oregon, Washington and Montana

Pleistocene pluvial lakes of the Basin & Range & adjacent areas of CA/ OR/ WA/ MT

The bull's eye marks the location of the Chicxulub impact site. The impact of a 10 mile wide meteor caused global climate changes that killed the dinosaurs and many other forms of life. By the Late Cretaceous the oceans had widened, and India approached the southern margin of Asia. The Chicxulub crater is buried underneath the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, and occurred 65 million years ago at the Createceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary.

The bull's eye marks the location of the Chicxulub impact site. The impact of a 10 mile wide meteor caused global climate changes that killed the dinosaurs and many other forms of life. By the Late Cretaceous the oceans had widened, and India approached t

The Paleontology Portal

Tethys Ocean - The Tethys Ocean was an ocean that existed between the continents of Gondwana and Laurasia during much of the Mesozoic era, before the opening of the Indian and Atlantic oceans during the Cretaceous period.

Cette image represente la Pangee parce que sa c'est la eclatement de Pangee Il Pernod beaucoup de temp et Je pense c'est represente Bon.

This picture shows Pangaea because it is the bursting of Pangea It Pernod many temp and I think it is good.

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