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Erich von Falkenhayn (11 September 1861 – 8 April 1922) was a German soldier and Chief of the General Staff during the first two years of World War I. He became a military writer after World War I.

Erich von Falkenhayn September 1861 – 8 April was a German soldier and Chief of the General Staff during the first two years of World War I. He became a military writer after World War I.

Generaal Erich von Falkenhayn

This Day in World War 1 History: Mar 1916 New German attacks at Verdun: Battle of the Flanks

Chief of General Staff and Minister of War Erich von Falkenhayn

An image of Erich von Falkenhayn, the man who wrote a letter to the German Kaiser, Wilhelm II, convincing him that attacking the French town of Verdun would be the quickest way to secure a victory for Germany in the war.

German Army Chief of Staff Erich von Falkenhayn - First battle of Ypres - Pte Wilson

German Army Chief of Staff Erich von Falkenhayn - First battle of Ypres - Pte Wilson

Erich Von Falkenhayn general en chef de l'armée allemande a verdun

Erich Von Falkenhayn general en chef de l'armée allemande a verdun

Generalleutnant Otto Liman von Sanders (February 17, 1855 – August 22, 1929) was a German general who served as adviser and military commander for the Ottoman Empire during World War I.  In 1918, the last year of the war, Liman von Sanders took over command of the Ottoman army during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign, replacing the German General Erich von Falkenhayn who had been defeated by British General Allenby at the end of 1917.

Otto Liman von Sanders who is also an Ottoman military adviser who was imported directly from Germany

Erich von Falkenhayn tábornok.

Erich von Falkenhayn tábornok.

Soldiers (Germans) in WW1 trenches

German troops with their gas masks on prepare to oppose a bayonet attack. Note the "potato masher" hand grenade about to be launched.

WWI, Roumania; German General Erich von Falkenhayn on his way to the front line, accompanied by an Austro-Hungarian officer and his Chief of Staff, Col. Hans Hesse. ©IWM Q 24008

German General Erich von Falkenhayn on his way to the front line, accompanied by an Austro-Hungarian officer and his Chief of Staff, Col. ©IWM Q 24008

MOLTKE-Moltke was responsible for the failure, a blow that garnered him further disapproval from the emperor and one that would eventually cost him his career and his health. The 66-year-old suffered a mental breakdown, and six weeks after the outbreak of war, Germany lost its top commander. Against his wishes, Moltke was replaced by the Minister of War, Erich von Falkenhayn. Officially, he was relieved due to complications with his liver and gall bladder

MOLTKE-Moltke was responsible for the failure, a blow that garnered him further disapproval from the emperor and one that would eventually cost him his career and his health. The 66-year-old suffered a mental breakdown, and six weeks after the outbreak of war, Germany lost its top commander. Against his wishes, Moltke was replaced by the Minister of War, Erich von Falkenhayn. Officially, he was relieved due to complications with his liver and gall bladder

Erich von Falkenhayn. (Credit: Public Domain)

Explore 10 surprising facts about one of the longest and most brutal campaigns of World War I.

General Erich von Falkenhayn, Chief of the German General Staff.

General Erich von Falkenhayn, Chief of the German General Staff.