Umibōzu is a spirit in Japanese folklore. The Umibōzu is said to live in the ocean and capsize the ship of anyone who dares speak to it. This spirit’s name, which combines the character for “sea” with the character of “Buddhist monk,” is possibly related to the fact that the Umibōzu is said to have a large, round head, resembling the shaven heads of Buddhist monks. Alternatively, they are enormous Yōkai (spectres) that appear to shipwreck victims and fishermen.

'The Sailor Tokuso Encountering an Umibōzu' by Japanese printmaker Utagawa Kuniyoshi Ukiyo-e print. Umibōzu is a spirit in Japanese folklore. The Umibōzu is said to live in the ocean and capsize the ship of anyone who dares speak to it.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house. It also reminds me vaguely of cookie monster.

JAPAN's: Gasha-dokuro: Gasha-dokuro are skeletal giants which wander around the countryside in the darkest hours of the night.

Gashadokuro (Japanese) - Enormous Skeletons, and the favorite war-beasts of the Horseman of Famine.

Bakemono Zukushi - Japanese monsters (4)

Bakemono Zukushi – Japanese monsters from the Edo period

The Bakemono Zukushi handscroll, painted in the Edo period century) by an unknown artist, depicts 24 traditional monsters that once used to spook the people of Japan. Sara-hebi (shown here) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman.

Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore.... - explaining ...

Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals.

妖怪提灯お化け Yokai Chochin Obake (Lantern Ghost)  Yōkai (妖怪?, ghost, phantom, strange apparition) are a class of supernatural monsters in Japanese folklore. The word yōkai is made up of the kanji for "mysterious" and "weird".------ #japan #japanese #yokai

10 Artworks By Katsushika Hokusai You Should Know

Katsushika Hokusai: The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) - Museum of Fine Arts

Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater: The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

Baku (獏 or 貘) - The Dream Eater. Supernatural beings that devour dreams and nightmares. Has a long history in Japanese folklore and art.

Nekomata, two-tailed cat yōkai (supernatural creature) of folklore and classical kaidan | ニャア | 夜鷹 [pixiv] http://www.pixiv.net/member_illust.php?mode=medium&illust_id=29587646

“Nyaa” by ぴーすけ “Nekomata” is a lower level Japanese demon cat with a forked tail. Nekomatas walk on their hind legs and have necromancing ability.

Japanese folklore & legends

Nihon: almost a love story

Japanese folklore & legends

Hyakume- Japanese folklore: fleshy, humanoid blob. Covered in 100 eyes from head to toe. They live in abandoned homes and spacious temples. They are nocturnal and guard their living space from potential thieves. Their eyes can detach a float around patrolling the surrounding area. They are not very violent, relying on their size to intimidate intruders.

One of the weirdest yokai I have ever come across is this monstrosity, the one-hundred-eyed demon known as Hyakume. I painted a version of him a few years back, in my Hyakki Yako panels from the fi…

Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into men or women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories…

Kitsune

Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with

According to Japanese folklore, a cat (neko) that has lived for a long time can become a kind of youkai called a nekomata (猫叉). It was believed that after a cat reached ten years of age, its tail would slowly split into two tails, and, along the way, it would develop magic powers, primarily those of necromancy and shamanism. Nekomata also have an ability to shape shift into a human form and are generally hostile to humans.  There is also one kind of Nekomata that lived in Nabes

Nekomata (猫又), two-tailed cat yōkai (supernatural creature), from the Hyakkai-Zukan (百怪図巻), 1737

Kasa Obake- Japanese folklore: an umbrella that has come to life because it has existed for 100 years. It jumps around on one leg and is usually depicted with two arms. It has one eye and a long tongue coming out of a mouth.

Natsume Yuujinchou ~~ Remember the touching story of the yokai in the abandoned school building and the girl who loved him? This may be the classic ayakashi that he was based upon :: SciFi and Fantasy Art Yokai: Karakasa-obake by Richard Svensson

The rivers and lakes of Japan are have long been the haunts of a wide variety of strange creatures of all shapes and sizes. Although many of these have been regulated to the realm of pure folklore and myth, there are others that have transcended beyond mere legend and become thought of as something more cryptozoological in nature. One of the most well known of these is a mysterious, bipedal water dwelling creature known as the Kappa, which has skyrocketed past its origins as local folklore…

Kappa by Yuko Shimizu. This Yokai lives in the ponds and lakes. The Kappa seem to be very mischievous and like to wrestle people underwater.

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