Astronomers find the most powerful supernova explosion ever, located 3.8bn light-years away, and more luminous than the entire Milky Way!

Found: The Most Powerful Supernova Ever Seen In Universe!

Astronomers find the most powerful supernova explosion ever, located 3.8bn light-years away, and more luminous than the entire Milky Way!

Astronomers have found evidence for what is likely one of the most extreme pulsars, or rotating neutron stars, ever detected. The source exhibits properties of a highly magnetized neutron star, or magnetar, yet its deduced spin period is thousands of times longer than any pulsar ever observed. For decades, astronomers have known there is a dense, compact source at the center these remains of a supernova explosion located about 9,000 light years from Earth. Image credit: X-ray…

Astronomers have found evidence for what is likely one of the most extreme pulsars, or rotating neutron stars, ever detected. The source exhibits properties of a highly magnetized neutron star, or magnetar, yet its deduced spin period is thousands of times longer than any pulsar ever observed. For decades, astronomers have known there is a dense, compact source at the center these remains of a supernova explosion located about 9,000 light years from Earth. Image credit: X-ray…

This is one of the most-famous astronomy photos in the world. Called "The Pillars of Creation" it was taken by the Hubble telescope in 1995 and shows massive columns of hydrogen gas and dust in the Eagle Nebula—7,000 light years from Earth.     Researchers took more images of this region of space using the Spitzer Space Telescope. These shots suggest that the Pillars of Creation might actually be long gone—destroyed thousands of years ago by a nearby supernova.

This is one of the most-famous astronomy photos in the world. Called "The Pillars of Creation" it was taken by the Hubble telescope in 1995 and shows massive columns of hydrogen gas and dust in the Eagle Nebula—7,000 light years from Earth. Researchers took more images of this region of space using the Spitzer Space Telescope. These shots suggest that the Pillars of Creation might actually be long gone—destroyed thousands of years ago by a nearby supernova.

Supernova Explosion by charmedy.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Supernova Explosion by charmedy.deviantart.com on @deviantART

This new Hubble image shows the spiral galaxy Messier 83, otherwise known as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy. This galaxy is dramatic and mysterious; it has hosted a large number of supernova explosions, and is thought to have a double nucleus lurking at its core. http://spacetelescope.org/news/heic1403/ AND http://infinity-imagined.tumblr.com/post/73545042127/spiral-galaxy-m83

This new Hubble image shows the spiral galaxy Messier 83, otherwise known as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy. This galaxy is dramatic and mysterious; it has hosted a large number of supernova explosions, and is thought to have a double nucleus lurking at its core. http://spacetelescope.org/news/heic1403/ AND http://infinity-imagined.tumblr.com/post/73545042127/spiral-galaxy-m83

Amazing universe! Supernova

Amazing universe! Supernova

NYX Baked Eyeshadows Swatches wet application - White Noise, Supernova, Chance

NYX Baked Eyeshadows

NYX Baked Eyeshadows Swatches wet application - White Noise, Supernova, Chance

A rare supernova explosion has led scientist's to believe they may be witnessing the birth of a black hole for the first time in history.

NASA data may have uncovered galaxy's youngest black hole

A rare supernova explosion has led scientist's to believe they may be witnessing the birth of a black hole for the first time in history.

NuSTAR NASA telescope has found evidence that a massive star exploded in an unbalanced way, ejecting material in a direction and the core of the star in another. The results offer the best evidence that exploding stars of this type, called Type II or core collapse supernovae, are asymmetric, a phenomenon that had been difficult to prove so far, NASA said in a statement.

NuSTAR NASA telescope has found evidence that a massive star exploded in an unbalanced way, ejecting material in a direction and the core of the star in another. The results offer the best evidence that exploding stars of this type, called Type II or core collapse supernovae, are asymmetric, a phenomenon that had been difficult to prove so far, NASA said in a statement.

Crab Nebula, by Hubble Space Telescope - This is a mosaic image, one of the largest ever taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion. Japanese and Chinese astronomers recorded this violent event nearly 1,000 years ago in 1054, as did, almost certainly, Native Americans. - Portal:Space/Featured.

Crab Nebula, by Hubble Space Telescope - This is a mosaic image, one of the largest ever taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion. Japanese and Chinese astronomers recorded this violent event nearly 1,000 years ago in 1054, as did, almost certainly, Native Americans. - Portal:Space/Featured.

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