Lydia Funk
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Furosaki; two-fold screen Scenes at the pleasure quarters circa 1700 cm 56 x 160.5 cm In the pleasure district of Yoshikawa in Edo, the stringent codes were meant to be forgotten. In this painting some clients are watching from outside the teahouse, while some are entering, one of them with the face hidden under a large basket hat. This ukiyo-e screen is representative of type of genre painting that had its origins in Rakuchū rakugai zu, but which abandons a comprehensive view of the city…

Furosaki; two-fold screen Scenes at the pleasure quarters circa 1700 cm 56 x 160.5 cm In the pleasure district of Yoshikawa in Edo, the stringent codes were meant to be forgotten. In this painting some clients are watching from outside the teahouse, while some are entering, one of them with the face hidden under a large basket hat. This ukiyo-e screen is representative of type of genre painting that had its origins in Rakuchū rakugai zu, but which abandons a comprehensive view of the city…

Chikanobu (1838 - 1912) Japanese Woodblock Print   Ghost of Taira no Tomomori, No. 45   Series; Eastern Brocades, Day and Night Compared

The Anchor Ghost and the Fisher Girl by Chikanobu. The ghost of Taira no Tomomori standing on the sea bed with crabs, fish and his companion ghosts. Behind Tomomori is the huge rusting anchor which dragged him to the bottom of the sea.

woodcut tiger - Recherche Google

woodcut tiger - Recherche Google

(Kyôto ningyôshi Ôishi...)  Japanese, Edo period, 1853 (Kaei 6), 6th month  Artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese, 1797–1861, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

Artist:Utagawa Kuniyoshi Title:Ushi-no-koku, or Ushi-no-toki, mairi (Two-o'clock in the morning prayer) to curse a person to death whom he or she detested Details:More information… Source:Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

Rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan

Rare photograph of an Onna-bugeisha, female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan. Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.