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The Sumerian King List (The Weld-Blundell Prism) lists a succession of kings and cities from Sumer, which begins with mythical kings, like Gilgamesh, and then goes on to list historical leaders. It is considered a key document in the decipherment of cuneiform. ca. 2000-1800 BCE

The Sumerian King List (The Weld-Blundell Prism) lists a succession of kings and cities from Sumer, which begins with mythical kings, like Gilgamesh, and then goes on to list historical leaders. It is considered a key document in the decipherment of cuneiform. ca. 2000-1800 BCE

"Lions of Assyria" - stone carving, British Museum (lion hunt, the royal sport of Assyrian kings)

"Lions of Assyria" - stone carving, British Museum (lion hunt, the royal sport of Assyrian kings)

ahencyclopedia: “ “ASSYRIAN LION-HUNTING AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM: ” WHOEVER was privileged to gain access to the North Palace of the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal at Nineveh, could consider himself part of...

ahencyclopedia: “ “ASSYRIAN LION-HUNTING AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM: ” WHOEVER was privileged to gain access to the North Palace of the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal at Nineveh, could consider himself part of...

Lyres from The Royal Tombs of Ur (ca 2550 BCE). - Ur (Sumerian: Urim) was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar in Iraq's Dhi Qar Governorate.

Lyres from The Royal Tombs of Ur (ca 2550 BCE). - Ur (Sumerian: Urim) was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar in Iraq's Dhi Qar Governorate.

The Nimrud lens is a 3000 year old piece of rock crystal, unearthed by Austen Henry Layard at the Assyrian palace of Nimrud. It may have been used as a magnifying glass, or as a burning-glass to start fires by concentrating sunlight. Assyrian craftsmen made intricate engravings, and could have used such a lens in their work. Italian scientist Giovanni Pettinato of the University of Rome has proposed that the lens was used by the ancient Assyrians as part of a telescope.

The Nimrud lens is a 3000 year old piece of rock crystal, unearthed by Austen Henry Layard at the Assyrian palace of Nimrud. It may have been used as a magnifying glass, or as a burning-glass to start fires by concentrating sunlight. Assyrian craftsmen made intricate engravings, and could have used such a lens in their work. Italian scientist Giovanni Pettinato of the University of Rome has proposed that the lens was used by the ancient Assyrians as part of a telescope.

Ashur, a Sumerian sky god who was also adopted as the head deity of the Assyrian pantheon. Ashur is pictured as a man riding within a winged sun disc that is almost identical to the one associated with the Shemsu Hor. It is worth remembering that the original Egyptian rendering of Osiris is Ausur, which for all intents and purposes is the same word as Ashur.

Ashur, a Sumerian sky god who was also adopted as the head deity of the Assyrian pantheon. Ashur is pictured as a man riding within a winged sun disc that is almost identical to the one associated with the Shemsu Hor. It is worth remembering that the original Egyptian rendering of Osiris is Ausur, which for all intents and purposes is the same word as Ashur.