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RICHARD BILLINGHAM Untitled (Artist’s parents), 1994-95.

By Richard Billingham, from his work; "Ray's a laugh" ©Richard Billingham - more realistic view of a family

Richard Billingham

[from the series, "Ray's a Laugh," by Richard Billingham, portraying his parents][odalisque-esque!

w o n d e r l a n d .

Garbage Girls

Messy Room - Photographer Maya Fuhr has taken it upon herself to document the wild girl in her natural habitat, the messy room.

Richard Billingham

Reinterpreting Unconventional Family Photographs: Returning to Richard Billingham’s ‘Ray’s a Laugh’ Series"

Caught in the act of being awesome!

YES! Security Cameras Capture Everyday People In The Act Of Being Awesome

Security camera videos capture good, too. Especially the one catching the guys dog for him.

5 Beginner DSLR Focusing Tips For Shooting Tack-Sharp Photos. (I loooove tack sharp. mmh;)

Five Beginner DSLR Focusing Tips for Shooting Tack-Sharp Photos

In this brief, whimsical documentary, the UK director Eleanor Mortimer turns her camera’s gaze on urban birdwatchers as they wait for, observe and marvel at the peregrine falcons hovering above Sheffield in the north of England. The result is a beguiling look at a uniquely human condition: envy of flying. Or maybe it’s something else that turns these city-dwellers’ eyes skywards. The pleasures of birdwatching are many; the words to describe them are perhaps best left to the poets among us.

We can’t fly like birds, nor can we stop our gaze soaring skyward to dream of it

In Phantom (2011), Gordon, collaborating with singer/songwriter Rufus Wainwright, examines grief and longing in a sonic and visual requiem. Expanding upon his use of portraiture as a tool for investigating the human condition, Gordon employs slow-motion film produced with a high-speed Phantom camera. The film focuses on Wainright's eye—blackened with make-up, weeping, and glaring back at the viewer, echoing melodramatic performances by stars of the silent screen.

In Phantom (2011), Gordon, collaborating with singer/songwriter Rufus Wainwright, examines grief and longing in a sonic and visual requiem. Expanding upon his use of portraiture as a tool for investigating the human condition, Gordon employs slow-motion film produced with a high-speed Phantom camera. The film focuses on Wainright's eye—blackened with make-up, weeping, and glaring back at the viewer, echoing melodramatic performances by stars of the silent screen.