Odysseus & Eurycleia. The well-known episode of the footbath during which Eurýkleia recognizes Odysseus by his scar, but he throttles her and keeps her quiet. - Homer's Odyssey, Book 19, Robert Fitzgerald (Alan Lee/user: Aethon)

The well-known episode of the footbath during which Eurýkleia recognizes Odysseus by his scar, but he throttles her and keeps her quiet.

The Laestrygonians Destroy Odysseus' Ships. "...swarming up from every side – hundreds, not like men, like Giants! Down from the cliffs they flung great rocks a man could hardly hoist and a ghastly shattering din rose up from all the ships – men in their death-cries, hulls smashed to splinters..." - Homer's Odyssey, Book 10 (Alan Lee/Fagles/user: Aethon))

The Laestrygonians Destroy Odysseus' Ships. "...swarming up from every side – hundreds, not like men, like Giants! Down from the cliffs they flung great rocks a man could hardly hoist and a ghastly shattering din rose up from all the ships – men in their death-cries, hulls smashed to splinters..." - Homer's Odyssey, Book 10 (Alan Lee/Fagles/user: Aethon))

'Close to the fire her women drew her favorite chair..here PENELOPE took her place...as she listened on, her tears flowed and soaked her cheeks...weeping for him, her husband, sitting there beside her.' - Homer's Odyssey, Book 19 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

'Close to the fire her women drew her favorite chair..here PENELOPE took her place...as she listened on, her tears flowed and soaked her cheeks...weeping for him, her husband, sitting there beside her.' - Homer's Odyssey, Book 19 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

'And there in the bedroom...PARIS...turning over and over his long curved bow. And there was HELEN...sitting with all the women of the house, directing the rich embroidered work they had in hand.' - Homer's Iliad, Book 6 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

'And there in the bedroom...PARIS...turning over and over his long curved bow. And there was HELEN...sitting with all the women of the house, directing the rich embroidered work they had in hand.' - Homer's Iliad, Book 6 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

ODYSSEUS Silences Thersites as Agamemnon & Nestor Watch. 'Odysseus stepped in quickly, faced him down with a dark glance and threats to break his nerve: “What a flood of abuse, Thersites!...Keep quiet. Who are you to wrangle with kings...' - Homer's Iliad, Book 2 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

Odysseus Silences Thersites as Agamemnon & Nestor Watch, Alan Lee/Robert Fagles

Venus & Adonis by Alan Lee. "She rested both on the grass and on him, cushioning her head on his chest, and interspersing words and kisses..." (Ovid's Metamorphoses-Lombardo/user: Aethon)

Venus & Adonis by Alan Lee. "She rested both on the grass and on him, cushioning her head on his chest, and interspersing words and kisses.

(Detail from) Odysseus Slaughters the Suitors by Alan Lee. (Homer's Odyssey/Wanderings of Odysseus/Ulysses' Revenge/Slaughter in the Hall)

(Detail from) Odysseus Slaughters the Suitors by Alan Lee. (Homer's Odyssey/Wanderings of Odysseus/Ulysses' Revenge/Slaughter in the Hall)

The Death of Hector by Alan Lee '...And a thick cloud of dust rose up from the man...dragged, his dark hair swirling round that head so handsome once, all tumbled low in the dust...' (Homer's Iliad/Black Ships Before Troy/Robert Fagles)

The Death of Hector by Alan Lee '.And a thick cloud of dust rose up from the man.dragged, his dark hair swirling round that head so handsome once, all tumbled low in the dust.' (Homer's Iliad/Black Ships Before Troy/Robert Fagles)

"...but ODYSSEUS aimed and shot ANTINOUS square in the throat, and the point went stabbing clean through the soft neck and out –and off to the side he pitched, the cup dropped from his grasp as the shaft sank home..." - Homer's Odyssey, Book 22 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

"...but ODYSSEUS aimed and shot ANTINOUS square in the throat, and the point went stabbing clean through the soft neck and out –and off to the side he pitched, the cup dropped from his grasp as the shaft sank home..." - Homer's Odyssey, Book 22 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

HELEN & PARIS at Sparta. "...if only death had pleased me...that day I followed [Paris] to Troy, forsaking my marriage bed, my kinsmen and my child." - Helen, Homer's lliad, Book 3 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

HELEN & PARIS at Sparta. "...if only death had pleased me...that day I followed [Paris] to Troy, forsaking my marriage bed, my kinsmen and my child." - Helen, Homer's lliad, Book 3 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

The Trojan Ally MEMNON Arrives at Troy with his Warriors. "...the most famous of the Ethiopians was their mighty king Memnon, son of Eos, goddess of Dawn. He came from the east to fight at Troy and was slain by the even mightier Achilles." - March, Jennifer R (Alan Lee/Trojan War/user: Aethon)

The Trojan Ally MEMNON Arrives at Troy with his Warriors. "...the most famous of the Ethiopians was their mighty king Memnon, son of Eos, goddess of Dawn. He came from the east to fight at Troy and was slain by the even mightier Achilles." - March, Jennifer R (Alan Lee/Trojan War/user: Aethon)

"Odysseus hungered to hear the Siren-song, so he ordered his men to bind him to the mast with strong ropes, and not to unbind him...until the island was well behind them." - Sutcliff (Alan Lee/Homer's Odyssey, Book 12/user: Aethon)

"Odysseus hungered to hear the Siren-song, so he ordered his men to bind him to the mast with strong ropes, and not to unbind him.

Driven by his charioteer Automedon, PATROCLUS reaches the lines & walls of Troy (Alan Lee/Homer's Iliad, Book 16/user: Aethon)

Patroclus, blind in his fatal frenzy, with his Charioteer Automedon, reach the lines & walls of Troy by Alan Lee (Homer's Iliad Book Patroclus fights and dies/Black Ships Before Troy/Myrmidons)

The Trojan Women Mourning HECTOR. "...and Andromache led their songs of sorrow, cradling the head of Hector, man-killing Hector gently in her arms.." - Homer's Iliad, Book 24 (Alan Lee/Robert Fagles/user: Aethon)

The Trojan Women Mourning HECTOR.and Andromache led their songs of sorrow, cradling the head of Hector, man-killing Hector gently in her arms.

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