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"Ohaguro is a Japanese aristocratic term describing the custom of dying one’s teeth black. In Japan, it existed from ancient times, and was seen among the civilians until the end of the Meiji period(1868 -1912). Pitch black things such as glaze like lacquer were seen as beautiful."

Ohaguro (お歯黒) is a custom of dyeing one’s teeth black. It was most popular in Japan until the Meiji era. Dyeing is mainly done by married women.

"Ohaguro is a Japanese aristocratic term describing the custom of dyeing one’s teeth black. In Japan, it existed from ancient times, and was seen among the civilians until the end of the Meiji period(1868 -1912). Pitch black things such as glaze like lacquer were seen as beautiful."

Ohaguro is a Japanese aristocratic term pertaining to the custom of dyeing one’s teeth black. This custom existed from ancient times and was seen as beautiful. It was also a symbol of wealth and maturity among women until the end of the Meiji period

Kyoto, Japan. 1977. The oiran’s helper, a young girl, in full dress at the Sumiya geisha house in the Shimabara area.  © Thomas Hoepker/Magnum Photos

Thomas HOEPKER :: The oiran's helper, a young girl, in full dress at the Sumiya geisha house in the Shimabara area, Kyoto, 1977

Africa | Bororo Fulani woman.  Garoua, Cameroon. 1980 | ©photographer unknown, via Cerca de Africa Blog

Escarificaciones africanas

A married woman, known by her red-coloured teeth, Japan.  Photograph from Nagasaki 1868.

A married woman, known by her black colored teeth (red-coloured though it has been said, is incorrect). Photograph from Nagasaki oha means teeth, guro means black

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In Japanese mythology, Izanami-no-Mikoto, meaning "she who invites" is a Goddess of both Creation and Death, as well as the former wife of the God Izanagi-no-Mikoto. She is also referred to as Izanami-no-kami.

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