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D10 Gasselte

D10 Gasselte

Dolmen/Hunebed D38 - Valtherbos, Emmen, the Netherlands

Dolmen/Hunebed D38 - Valtherbos, Emmen, the Netherlands

The Locmariaquer megaliths are well worth visiting as they include large and important remnants of the civilization that flourished near the Bay of Morbihan more than 4,500 years ago. This broken set of slabs is the remains of the largest known menhir ever erected in Europe. It is thought that it was toppled by an earthquake, but no one can tell. Nearby is an equally ancient dolmen with many carvings, including several of the double axe that is so characteristic of neolithic tombs in…

The Locmariaquer megaliths are well worth visiting as they include large and important remnants of the civilization that flourished near the Bay of Morbihan more than 4,500 years ago. This broken set of slabs is the remains of the largest known menhir ever erected in Europe. It is thought that it was toppled by an earthquake, but no one can tell. Nearby is an equally ancient dolmen with many carvings, including several of the double axe that is so characteristic of neolithic tombs in…

Hunebedden, Drente (prehistoric chamber tombs similar to dolmens)- this was near where we lived..Went there many times!

single-chamber tombs, consisting of 2 or more upright stones supporting a large flat horizontal capstone (table). Most date from the early Neolithic period: 4000 to 3000 BC.

Poblado de los Millares. Almeria. 2700-1800 a.C

Poblado de los Millares. Almeria. 2700-1800 a.C

Hunebed Tynaarlo

Hunebed Tynaarlo

Silbury Hill, UK. Silbury Hill, near Avebury in Wiltshire, is the largest prehistoric man-made mound in Europe. It was created around 2660 BCE and stands 130 feet high, but its purpose is unknown. Despite centuries of study and excavation, it remains one of the most enigmatic of British prehistoric sites.

Silbury Hill, near Avebury in Wiltshire, is the largest prehistoric mound in Europe. It was created around 2660 BCE and stands 130 feet high. Despite centuries of study and excavation, it remains one of the most enigmatic of British prehistoric sites.

Knowth is the largest of all passage graves situated within the Brú na Bóinne complex. The site consists of one large mound (known as Site 1) and 17 smaller satellite tombs. Essentially Knowth (Site 1) is a large mound (covering roughly a hectare) and contains two passages, placed along an east-west line. It is encircled by 127 kerbstones (3 of which are missing, 4 are badly damaged).

Knowth is a complex of prehistoric passage tombs just west of Newgrange in County Meath, Ireland. Knowth is the largest of all passage-tombs within the Brú na Bóinne complex.

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