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Bio-luminescent mushroom (Mycena chlorophos), one of more than 70 species of glowing fungus identified so far.

In the depths of the oceans, forests, coral reefs and even the damp caves of New Zealand, living things are creating their own light. Scientist are discovering how and why these organisms glow.

Ctenophores Unlock Molecular Key to Understanding Animal Evolution and Disease  Learn more by visiting us at: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch  Photo: NOAA/OAR/NURP

Research unlocks molecular key to animal evolution and disease

, sponsors this free, ad-free, award-winning online publication for kids. It offers current and interesting science news stories accompanied by suggestions for hands-on activities and resources for further learning.

examples of deep sea bioluminescence in a sea worm, known as tomopteris, From the IMAX documentary ‘Into The Deep’ (gif)

examples of deep sea bioluminescence in a sea worm, known as tomopteris, From the IMAX documentary ‘Into The Deep’ (gif)

Praya dubia

The manner with which marine animals move is diverse and interesting. In a new study, a group of researchers investigated the locomotion processes of a jellyfish-like colonial species that use multiple jets for movement.

Scientists have just identified 180 new biofluorescent fish. Video chat about it at https://createamixer.com/

These new species of biofluorescent fish are beautifully strange

Scientists Discover 180 Species of Glowing Fish: A biofluorescent surgeonfish (Acanthurus coeruleus, larval)

Environmental Adaptation | Bioluminescence | Urchin | Electric blue beauty.

Sea urchin, blue bioluminescence from the Museum Oceanographique, Monaco.

Glowing bamboo coral (Isidella sp.) found on the Caribbean seafloor.

In Photos: Glowing Seafloor Creatures of the Caribbean

), found on the Caribbean seafloor. (Credit: Sonke Johnsen, Image courtesy of Bioluminescence Team NOAA-OER.

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