Small spiral galaxy NGC 7742. This spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core. The core of NGC 7742 is the large yellow 'yolk' in the centreof the image. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA) - via Jean-Baptiste Faure

Sunny Side Up / NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's face-on snapshot of the small spiral galaxy NGC .this spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core.

NGC 4622

Color image of NGC 4622 shows strong inner counter clockwise outward winding single arm and strong outer clockwise outward winding pair of arms.Photos: 65 All-Time Great Galaxy Hits

The Spiral Galaxy NGC 3627 - Located About 30 Million Light Years From Earth:

Spiral galaxy NGC located about 30 million light years from Earth.

UGC 12158 is a huge spiral galaxy that is a near-twin of the Milky Way. Our galaxy would look much like this if we could see it from 100,000 light years due up. Photo by ESA/Hubble & NASA

Two New Discoveries About the Milky Way Galaxy

ugc Barred spiral bares all. The galaxy captured in this image, called UGC certainly isn’t camera-shy: this spiral stunner is posing face-on to the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, revealing its structure in fine detail.

Despite being less famous than its galactic cousins, elliptical or spiral galaxies, dwarf irregular galaxies - as captured in this image by the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA / ESA - is a very common type of galaxy in the universe. Known as UGC 4459, this dwarf galaxy lies about 11 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major, a constellation that is also home to the Pinwheel Galaxy (M101), the Owl Nebula (M97) , Messier 81, Messier 82 and other galaxies belonging to M81 group.

Despite being less famous than its galactic cousins, elliptical or spiral…

A dance of supermassive black holes | EarthSky.org

A dance of supermassive black holes | EarthSky.org

Spiral Galaxy Messier 81 The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this NASA Spitzer Space Telescope image. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

Spiral Galaxy Messier 81 The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this NASA Spitzer Space Telescope image. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

Giant, dense molecular cloud NGC 7000 lies in the heart of an active star formation region. Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum

Giant, dense molecular cloud NGC 7000 lies in the heart of an active star formation region. Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum via Barb Wagner.

Colour-composite image of the central 5,500 light-years wide region of the spiral galaxy NGC 1097, obtained with the NACO adaptive optics on the VLT. More than 300 star forming regions - white spots in the image - are distributed along a ring of dust and gas in the image. Credit: ESO

The eye at the center of this galaxy is actually a monstrous black hole surrounded by a ring of stars. The galaxy, called NGC 1097 and located 50 million light-years away, is spiral-shaped like our Milky Way, with long, spindly arms of stars.

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