Erkunde Skulpturen, Neue Kunst und noch mehr!

Statuette of a seated harp player [Cycladic; Grotta-Pelos culture] (47.100.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Statuette of a seated harp player [Cycladic; Grotta-Pelos culture] (47.100.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Head from the figure of a woman, ca. 2700–2500 b.c.; Early Cycladic I–II  Cycladic; Keros-Syros culture  Marble

Head from the figure of a woman, ca. 2700–2500 b.c.; Early Cycladic I–II Cycladic; Keros-Syros culture Marble

Seated Harp Player, ca. 2800–2700 B.C. Cycladic. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1947 (47.100.1) | This work is one of the earliest of the few known representations of musicians in art of the Early Bronze Age from the Cycladic islands. Such harp players likely represent significant members of their communities, serving as human repositories and communicators of their people's history, mythology, and music in a time before writing. #OneMetManyWorlds

Seated Harp Player, ca. 2800–2700 B.C. Cycladic. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1947 (47.100.1) | This work is one of the earliest of the few known representations of musicians in art of the Early Bronze Age from the Cycladic islands. Such harp players likely represent significant members of their communities, serving as human repositories and communicators of their people's history, mythology, and music in a time before writing. #OneMetManyWorlds

The Kelteminar Culture lasted from roughly 6000 BC - 3000 BC (or before or after, the evidence is scant). It was a Neolithic archaeological culture of sedentary fishermen occupying the semi-desert and desert areas of the Karakum and Kyzyl Kum deserts and the deltas of the Amu Darya and Zeravshan rivers in the territories of ancient Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. They hunted and gathered. But, they were not nomadic.

The Kelteminar Culture lasted from roughly 6000 BC - 3000 BC (or before or after, the evidence is scant). It was a Neolithic archaeological culture of sedentary fishermen occupying the semi-desert and desert areas of the Karakum and Kyzyl Kum deserts and the deltas of the Amu Darya and Zeravshan rivers in the territories of ancient Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. They hunted and gathered. But, they were not nomadic.

Kermos, Jar, and Jug [Cycladic] (2004.363.1-3) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kermos, Jar, and Jug [Cycladic] (2004.363.1-3) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Marble female figure Period: Early Cycladic II Date: 2700–2600 B.C. Culture: Cycladic @Wendy Felts Werley-Williams.metmuseum.org

Marble female figure Period: Early Cycladic II Date: 2700–2600 B.C. Culture: Cycladic @Wendy Felts Werley-Williams.metmuseum.org

Kermos, Jar, and Jug [Cycladic] (2004.363.1-3) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kermos, Jar, and Jug [Cycladic] (2004.363.1-3) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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