Explore Maori People, Vintage Portrait, and more!

Explore related topics

Unidentified Maori woman

Unidentified Maori woman, circa She wears European clothing and feathers in her hair.

Four Maori women from Hawkes Bay

Carte de visite portrait of four Maori women from Hawkes Bay, taken, probably between 1870 and by Samuel Carnell of Napier. Dated from Carne.

This photograph of an unidentified Maori man with a moko (facial tattoo) was taken in 1880.     Some Christian missionaries disapproved of moko, arguing that they were a heathen practice, so some Maori men let their facial hair grow to cover their tattoos.     Friggin missionaries.

This photograph of an unidentified Maori man with a moko (facial tattoo) was taken in Some Christian missionaries disapproved of moko, arguing that they were a heathen practice, so some Maori men let their facial hair grow to cover their tattoos.

Hami Te Hau, [between 1870 and 1890] wearing a korowai (tag cloak), photographed probably by Samuel Carnell of Napier.

Hami Te Hau, [between 1870 and wearing a korowai (tag cloak), photographed probably by Samuel Carnell of Napier.

Ngati Tuwharetoa women waiting for land court hearing at Tokaanu.1914

Under the Native Land Court acts of 1862 and the courts were able to grant…

Maori Warrior painted by RobertRamirez  Moko and Hair Ref. Adornment and Feather Ref

Maori Warrior painted by RobertRamirez Moko and Hair Ref. Adornment and Feather Ref

Unidentified Maori woman

Half length portrait of an unidentified Maori woman wearing European clothing and holding her hand to her chest, photographed by William James Hard.

maori guides sophia hinerangi - Google Search

Maori woman from Hawkes Bay district / Alexander Turnbull Library

maori chief, watene

Maori are the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand. Contemporary Maori culture has been shaped by the traditions of its rich cultural heritage.

Digitised Image

Eleanor Catherine Sperrey, Wai-Ringiringi, a Maori chieftainess. Wife of the celebrated Wahanui, 1935

Maori woman from Hawkes Bay district, 1880

Photograph taken by Samuel Carnell in The same woman is pictured in Inscri.

Hongi is a traditional Maori greeting, which literally means “to share breath”. Hongi is done by pressing one’s nose to the other person when they meet each other. It is believed that when the two noses meet, people exchange their breath and the visitor becomes one of the local people (tangata whenua).

Tamaki Maori Village , Rotorua - Traveldrift - Browse New Zealand attractions, activity, tour planning, booking and reservations website and mobile information

Pinterest
Search