Erkunde Madagaskar, Beerdigung und noch mehr!

Standing grave post figure Madagascar, Sakalava  funeral post, which usually have a height of two, up to four meters, and which used to be placed on the "valavato", the funeral area of distinguished clans. The restless souls of the diceased inhabited the "aloalas". They could be calmed down and honoured by sacrifices.  H: 90 cm

Standing grave post figure Madagascar, Sakalava funeral post, which usually have a height of two, up to four meters, and which used to be placed on the "valavato", the funeral area of distinguished clans. The restless souls of the diceased inhabited the "aloalas". They could be calmed down and honoured by sacrifices. H: 90 cm

Africa | Tomb stela "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood, greyish patina | The most distinctive structures of Madagaskar are massive, case-like tombs of milled and crude stone. They are placed isolated within the landscape, often crowned by a row of up to thirty carved "aloala" posts. Such graves are reserved for kings and dignitaries, big tombs can only be afforded by rich people.

Africa | Tomb stela "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood, greyish patina | The most distinctive structures of Madagaskar are massive, case-like tombs of milled and crude stone. They are placed isolated within the landscape, often crowned by a row of up to thirty carved "aloala" posts. Such graves are reserved for kings and dignitaries, big tombs can only be afforded by rich people.

Africa | Funerary post from the Mahafaly culture of Madagascar | 19th century | Wood and pigment

Africa | Funerary post from the Mahafaly culture of Madagascar | 19th century | Wood and pigment

Africa | Fragment of a grave post "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Light brown wood, with a matt patina

Africa | Fragment of a grave post "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Light brown wood, with a matt patina

Africa | Tomb stela "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood, greyish patina | The most distinctive structures of Madagaskar are massive, case-like tombs of milled and crude stone. They are placed isolated within the landscape, often crowned by a row of up to thirty carved "aloala" posts. Such graves are reserved for kings and dignitaries, big tombs can only be afforded by rich people.

Africa | Tomb stela "aloala" from the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood, greyish patina | The most distinctive structures of Madagaskar are massive, case-like tombs of milled and crude stone. They are placed isolated within the landscape, often crowned by a row of up to thirty carved "aloala" posts. Such graves are reserved for kings and dignitaries, big tombs can only be afforded by rich people.

Africa | Fragment of a grave post "aloala" of the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood

Africa | Fragment of a grave post "aloala" of the Mahafaly people of Madagascar | Wood

Africa | The top of a funeral post made from Camphor wood from the Vezo or Sakalava people of Madagascar | Early 20th century

Africa | The top of a funeral post made from Camphor wood from the Vezo or Sakalava people of Madagascar | Early 20th century

In Madagascar, people dig up the bones of their loved ones and dance in the streets with them every year in a tradition called Famadihana. T...

In Madagascar, people dig up the bones of their loved ones and dance in the streets with them every year in a tradition called Famadihana. T...

Each year, the Malagasy people of Madagascar perform a funeral tradition called Famadihana. The ceremony involves the digging up of the bones of loved ones, dressing them in new clothing, and dancing with them around the tomb to live music.

Each year, the Malagasy people of Madagascar perform a funeral tradition called Famadihana. The ceremony involves the digging up of the bones of loved ones, dressing them in new clothing, and dancing with them around the tomb to live music.

Funeral tomb near Tulear

Funeral tomb near Tulear

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