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Fig. 3. The slate with sketches from the final phase of the second ringfort. (Photograph Ulster Museum).

The slate with sketches from the final phase of the second ringfort.

"Dave's" back, with boar heads

English copper alloy pommel-cap etched with boars and knotwork. Another beautiful piece of Anglo-Saxon craftsmanship from the Staffordshire Hoard.

Top: Irad and his wife attended by a midwife; Center: Irad and his wife attended by a midwife; Bottom:  Lamech with his wives Adah and Zillah - Junius Manuscript - late 10th-early 11th century

Top: Irad and his wife attended by a midwife; Center: Irad and his wife attended by a midwife; Bottom: Lamech with his wives Adah and Zillah - Junius Manuscript - late century

A ninth-century Anglo-Saxon gold plague with a zoo-anthromorphic symbol of St John the Evangelist, with eagle head and human hands holding a book (symbol of his Gospel). (British Museum)

A ninth-century Anglo-Saxon gold plaque with a zoo-anthromorphic symbol of St John the Evangelist, with eagle head and human hands holding a book (symbol of his Gospel).

More than ten centuries after being buried in a field in Galloway, conservators are releasing images that reveal the contents of a pot of Viking treasure for the first time.

In pictures: Contents of Viking hoard discovered in Galloway revealed for first time

The situation that Caesar had to face at Alesia was undoubtedly one of the most dangerous in hisotry: besieging the Gauls, while being surrounded by another enemy army during the same siege. On the other hand, if the city of Alesia was well situated on a hill at 150 metres above sea level and bathed at the bottom by two rivers, was not large enough to accommodate the entire army of Vercingetorix, that was forced to build a ditch and an embankment around the same Alesia where hide.

The situation that Caesar had to face at Alesia was undoubtedly one of the most dangerous in hisotry: besieging the Gauls, while being surrounded by another enemy army during the same siege. On the other hand, if the city of Alesia was well situated on a hill at 150 metres above sea level and bathed at the bottom by two rivers, was not large enough to accommodate the entire army of Vercingetorix, that was forced to build a ditch and an embankment around the same Alesia where hide.

Meigle 4 [Back]

A 'Class II Pictish Symbol Stone', located in Meigle Museum, Meigle, Perthshire.

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