During heavy winds, Russian fireball hitodama (a fiery apparition composed of spirits of the recently departed) could be heard to say, Oroshiya, oroshiya. There is some speculation that the author dreamed up the creature based on a play on words, as oroshiya sounds like the old Japanese pronunciation of Russia.

During heavy winds, Russian fireball hitodama (a fiery apparition composed of…

Uwan, 1737 by Sawaki Sūshi. Uwan /うわん,  is a formless yōkai, a disembodied voice that inhabits old, abandoned temples and homes. In the Edo period, these demon spirits assumed physical bodies.

dressrehearsalrag: “ Uwan from the Hyakkai-Zukan by Sawaki Sūshi, 1737 An uwan (うわん) is a disembodied voice that inhabits old, abandoned temples and homes. According to ancient legends from Aomori.

ubume | Las ubume, son un tipo de fantasma japonés, concretamente los ...

Fantasmas Japoneses IX: Ubume

産女 (Childbirth Woman) Ubume are spirits of women who have either died in childbirth or died without making sure that their children have been provided for. A mother’s concern for her children is a.

Sōgenbi -- Fiery ghost of oil-thieving monk (based on Kyoto legend). The Kaibutsu Ehon ("Illustrated Book of Monsters") is an 1881 book featuring woodblock prints of yōkai, or creatures from Japanese folklore. Illustrated by painter Nabeta Gyokuei.

Sōgenbi -- Fiery ghost of oil-thieving monk (based on Kyoto legend). The Kaibutsu Ehon ("Illustrated Book of Monsters") is an 1881 book featuring woodblock prints of yōkai, or creatures from Japanese folklore. Illustrated by painter Nabeta Gyokuei.

毛羽毛現 Keukegen, Japanese Filth Monster - Imgur

毛羽毛現 Keukegen, Japanese Filth Monster

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house. It also reminds me vaguely of cookie monster.

Okiku-mushi / 於菊虫 from "Ehon Hyaku monogatari", 1841 by Takehara Shunsen || Okiku is a vengeful spirit from "Bancho Sarayashiki" kaidan story

Okiku-mushi / 於菊虫 from "Ehon Hyaku monogatari", 1841 by Takehara Shunsen

Tsukumogami - Japanese Artifact Spirit    According to Japanese folklore, when an object turns 100 years old it gains self-awareness and comes to life. These spirits are mostly friendly, but can be wrathful if they feel they were mistreated. In some cases the Tsukumogami grow features (such as eyes and mouth) and appendages while others come to life more subtly.

Tsukumogami - Japanese Artifact Spirit According to Japanese folklore, when an object turns 100 years old it gains self-awareness and comes to life. These spirits are mostly friendly, but can be.

Pinterest
Search