Stefanie Mueller

Stefanie Mueller

Berlin, Germany / PhD Student working on "Digital Fabrication", Advisor: Patrick Baudisch, Human Computer Interaction Lab, Hasso Plattner Institute
Stefanie Mueller
Weitere Ideen von Stefanie
Melinda Looi 3d printed shoes

Melinda Looi 3d printed shoes

Imbalance suggests a feeling of dynamism and movement in static objects. It is therefore not surprising that many 3D models stand in impossibly balanced configurations. As long as the models remain in a computer this is of no consequence: the laws of physics do not apply. However, fabrication through 3D printing breaks the illusion: printed models topple instead of standing as initially intended. We propose to assist users in producing novel, properly balanced designs by interactively…

Imbalance suggests a feeling of dynamism and movement in static objects. It is therefore not surprising that many 3D models stand in impossibly balanced configurations. As long as the models remain in a computer this is of no consequence: the laws of physics do not apply. However, fabrication through 3D printing breaks the illusion: printed models topple instead of standing as initially intended. We propose to assist users in producing novel, properly balanced designs by interactively…

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130509-could-3d-scanner-detect-mist-smoke-or-humidity-here-are-the-remarkable-results.html

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130509-could-3d-scanner-detect-mist-smoke-or-humidity-here-are-the-remarkable-results.html

Craft Ethnography. In this field study I wish to examine the apparent human need to make things, to be creative. It is a study of material culture, as reflected in the works of activists in the rising fields of personal (digital) fabrication and the do-it-yourself (DIY) movement. But this research is more than a review of contemporary techniques and makers. In this study I  investigate deep into the roots of craft, in a search for the origin of our need to create.

Craft Ethnography. In this field study I wish to examine the apparent human need to make things, to be creative. It is a study of material culture, as reflected in the works of activists in the rising fields of personal (digital) fabrication and the do-it-yourself (DIY) movement. But this research is more than a review of contemporary techniques and makers. In this study I investigate deep into the roots of craft, in a search for the origin of our need to create.

Hybrid Reassemblage: An Exploration of Craft, Digital Fabrication and Artifact Uniqueness. This work combines digital fabrication and craft in a work involving object destruction and restoration: an intentionally broken crafted artifact and a 3D printed restoration. The motivation is not to restore the original work but to transform it into a new object in which both the destructive event and the restoration are visible and the re-assembled object functions as a memorial.

Hybrid Reassemblage: An Exploration of Craft, Digital Fabrication and Artifact Uniqueness. This work combines digital fabrication and craft in a work involving object destruction and restoration: an intentionally broken crafted artifact and a 3D printed restoration. The motivation is not to restore the original work but to transform it into a new object in which both the destructive event and the restoration are visible and the re-assembled object functions as a memorial.

Digital Fab and the design of musical instruments. This research considers the controversy of modern acoustic instruments, which may have come to an evolutionary impasse, due to its high standardization that makes it difficult to explore design modifications. I explore a new approach for the design and fabrication of the acoustic instrument, using 3D printing, which has the potential to influence new designs, and to lead to new acoustics and ergonomic innovations.

Digital Fab and the design of musical instruments. This research considers the controversy of modern acoustic instruments, which may have come to an evolutionary impasse, due to its high standardization that makes it difficult to explore design modifications. I explore a new approach for the design and fabrication of the acoustic instrument, using 3D printing, which has the potential to influence new designs, and to lead to new acoustics and ergonomic innovations.