Dr. Eliza Ann Grier. Born a slave she became the first African American to practice medicine in Georgia

Elizabeth Ann Grier, the first African-American woman licensed to practice medicine in Georgia. She was an emancipated slave who alternated every year of her medical education with a year of picking cotton in order to pay for her training.

Bessie Coleman - first female African American pilot. No American flight schools would take her, so she moved to France to train and live. She earned her living barnstorming and stunt flying.

Bessie Coleman: The first African-American woman pilot is highlighted in Kate Schatz's new book Rad American Women A-Z. In addition to this star aviator, Rad American Women features an awesome list of real-life women you can dress up as for Halloween.

Sarah Boone invented and pattened the ironing board.

Sarah Boone an inventor who rec'd a patent for improvements to the ironing board. Boone’s ironing board was designed to improve the quality of ironing sleeves and the bodies of women’s garments. The board was very narrow, curved, and made of

1930s - Great photobooth couple.

Since 1925 the photo booth has been capturing our images and our imaginations.

Grant Johnson was the son of a Black Chickasaw Freedman father, and a Black Creek Freedman mother, Grant Johnson was born in northern Texas during the Civil War and raised in Indian Territory. This same territory is where Johnson would become renowned as one of the greatest U.S. Deputy Marshals in history..

Isom Dart ~ A Black Cowboy It seems history has conspired against the many cowboys of color. Isom Dart is one of those black cowboys whose adventures are often left untold. Born a slave in Arkansas and later freed by the Civil War he rode West.

Zelda Wynn Valdes, first African American fashion designer, and Dorothy Dandridge :)

vintageblackglamour: “ Dorothy Dandridge being fitted for a gown by designer, Zelda Wynn Valdes in a photo from a 1954 issue of Hue. Valdes designed for Josephine Baker, Sarah Vaughan, Maria Cole.

African American Inventor John Standard patented an improved refrigerator design standard (a non-electrical and unpowered design, refrigerator using a manually-filled ice chamber for chilling) on June 14 1891 (U.S. patent #455,891).

African American Inventor John Standard patented an improved refrigerator design standard (a non-electrical and unpowered design, refrigerator using a manually-filled ice chamber for chilling) on June 14 1891 (U.

Yale Law School, class of 1921

Photograph from the Yale Law School of black students (left to right): J. Alston Atkins, Charles A. Chandler, Mifflin Gibbs, and Leroy Pierce.

Pittsburg, Texas, native Dr. Mildred Jefferson (1926-2010). In 1951, Jefferson was the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School. She later became a surgeon at Boston University Medical Center where she served as a professor of surgery.

Mildred Jefferson In Jefferson was the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School. She later became a surgeon at Boston University Medical Center where she served as a professor of surgery.

Clara Belle Williams (1885-1994) Lived to be 108 years old. She also had three sons who all became physicians.

Clara Belle Williams Lived to be 108 years old. She also had three sons who all became physicians.

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